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ASA is the essential resource to cultivate leadership, advance knowledge, and strengthen the skills of those who work with, and on behalf of, older adults.

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Blog Submission Guidelines

Do you have something you'd like to share with ASA members and other readers of AgeBlog? We accept guest submissions for AgeBlog from ASA members. Our guidelines are as follows. 

If you are not a current member of ASA and would like to join, click here.

What We Accept

  • AgeBlog articles should substantively address the nexus of aging and topics related to multicultural aging.
  • We specifically welcome contributions that discuss the implications of a topic for people ages 50‐plus and for professionals who work with them.
  • We are eager to receive articles dealing directly with the concerns of diverse racial, ethnic and cultural communities, of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender communities and of people of all abilities. We encourage authors to include diverse perspectives in articles on all topics.
  • We want orginal and unique content.
  • By submitting an article the author gives ASA permission to publish the article on the Web and assigns to ASA, without restriction, all worldwide rights, title, and interest in and to the article. If your article has been previously published, we will consider republishing as long as (a) the author controls or can arrange the necessary rights for ASA to reuse the content indefinitely with any existing copyright holder. (See below for our enitre copyright statement)

AgeBlog Lengths, Style, and Format

  • At the top of the article, clearly indicate your name in the form in which you wish it to appear in the article byline.
  • Article Text: Roughly 500-1000 words
  • For each article where it is appropriate authors are encouraged to submit a “sidebar” with added information relevant to the topic of the article—for example, briefly annotated listings of useful websites, recommended reading and other resources, ideally those also available online. 
  • Blog articles should be written in an accessible, journalistic style emphasizing clarity, liveliness and concision rather than academic formality.
  • Do not include footnotes, endnotes or reference lists. If necessary, mention important sources in journalistic style within the text of the article, giving the author’s full name along with the source title, date and publisher (e.g., “according to a study by Rosa Vasquez in the winter 2006 issue of Generations...”).
  • Send illustrations as 72 dpi JPG, PNG or TIF files, along with detailed caption and credit information. Illustrations will be included at the discretion of the editor and may be cropped to fit our page template to 190 x 96 pixels. If you do not know the copyright status of a graphic or image or are unable to obtain direct permission from the owner or creator of the image for ASA to use it without payment or royalty, do not submit the image for inclusion.
  • Author Byline: A one- to two-sentence biographical statement at the end of the text. If you wish to link to your website, blog, email or other social media profile, don't forget to include those links here.

How to Submit

  • Send your article by email to ASA at info@asaging.org and make sure "Blog contribution" is in the subject line.
  • Please note: Articles developed through constituent groups should be sent to the member of the editorial committee who solicited the contribution.
  • Attach your article in any current version of Microsoft Word or as plain‐text or rich‐text format (RTF) file
  • ASA will not send confirmation of every submission, but we will send you a link if your blog is published.

FAQs

  • What are your deadlines? We accept member guest blog submissions on a rolling basis. Constituent Group editorial committees may establish their own schedule and deadlines. If you are writing for a post for a constituent group, contact the member of the editoral committee who solicited the contribution for more information.
  • Do I get final say in how the article looks? All articles contributed are subject to professional editing for conformity to our style and length restrictions and authors may occasionally be asked to revise or supplement their contributions with additional details, references or links when necessary. Our editorial objective is to remain faithful to an author’s intent and meaning, but the contingencies of producing the blog preclude seeking approval for required editing.
  • Can changes be made after the article is published? Yes, if you have minor edits, just let us know.

Copyright

By submitting an article the author gives ASA permission to publish the article on the Web and assigns to ASA, without restriction, all worldwide rights, title, and interest in and to the article. If authors choose to subsequently republish their contributions to AgeBlog in another medium, publication or venue, we ask that reference to the initial publication within AgeBlog with full and complete acknowledgment of ASA’s rights in the article (including, without limitation, the copyright notice that appears in ASA’s original publication of the article) be included. If your article has been previously published, we will consider republishing as long as (a) the author controls or can arrange the necessary rights for ASA to reuse the content indefinitely with any existing copyright holder.

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