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ASA is the essential resource to cultivate leadership, advance knowledge, and strengthen the skills of those who work with, and on behalf of, older adults.

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RLowe's blog

#AIA17: Day One

posted 03.21.2017

Welcome to Aging in America 2017! A record-breaking 1,650 people came through the conference registration area (and patiently waited at points in some long lines). Attendees didn't lose any time fanning out to the 90+ workshops, symposia and other programs. From the National Forum on Family Caregiving to the evening peer groups, a beautifully diverse community of professionals began a week-long journey of learning, sharing and connecting.

In the Midst of “Shock and Awe,” It’s Up to Us to Act

posted 03.19.2017

By William Benson

As readers peruse the most recent issue of Aging Today, Donald Trump is more than a third through the first 100 days of his presidency, a key milestone Trump has made more significant through his boasts of what he will do. It’s a “shock and awe” kind of legislative first year, as John Cutler notes in his In Focus story elsewhere in the issue.


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The New, Old-Fashioned Way of Financing Long-Term Care

posted 03.10.2017

By John Cutler

When there is a new Administration in office it is always a good time to address pressing issues. And this occasion also coincides with a new Congress intent on making good on their promises.


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Optimal and Affordable Medication Use for Older Patients—A Receding Goal?

posted 03.09.2017

By Jerry Avorn

These are times of great ferment in relation to prescription drugs, especially as they relate to older patients. Controversy and change are brewing in the areas of medication research, approval, promotion, pricing and reimbursement. From the perspective of care for elders, many proposed changes are worrisome, and few are encouraging.

Drug Research and Development


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Vision Problems—Just Part of Aging?

posted 03.03.2017

By Jeff Todd

“Your eyesight is the first to go.” “It’s just part of getting older.” Such phrases of acceptance are often heard as we enter our 40s and 50s. Yes, our eyes—our vision—will invariably change as we age; however, through early detection of eye disease and other problems and access to affordable treatment options (including glasses and contacts), our eyesight, and thus our quality of life, doesn’t have to be significantly altered.

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